A Patriotic Shed in Old Centreville

Yesterday was a great day for picture-taking, even for those of us with little to no photographic talent. The sky was gray and heavy and threatening torrential downpour, but the sun was somehow managing to shine through a little, making for great lighting. Very summer-y. So I decided to take advantage of the flattering light  situation and do a little afternoon suburban exploration.

Behind 29, there’s this small, semi-forgotten street that might best be described as “main street” if Centreville were that kind of place. Except it’s not that kind of place, at least not anymore, and I think all the old buildings were just thrown together to make room for new developments. So we’ll just call it Old Centreville. Old Centreville is home to half a dozen old churches, a historic site, a museum and a few converted old houses. There’s really not much to it and as far as old towns go, it’s not particularly appealing or interesting. But because I’m probably one of the few people in the area who actually lived here when it wasn’t much more than farmland, woods, meadows, horses and old houses, I have a soft spot in my heart for pre-suburban sprawl Centreville.

A patriotic shed in Old Centreville.

A patriotic shed in Old Centreville.

Road leading to St. John's  Episcopal Church.

Road leading to St. John’s Episcopal Church.

St. John's Church up close. The church's current structure dates back to 1867.

St. John’s Church up close. The church’s current structure dates back to 1867.

The cemetery at St. John's Church. The oldest grave markers here date back to the mid 1800s, but you can see a suburban development in the background.

The cemetery at St. John’s Church. The oldest grave markers here date back to the mid 1800s, but you can see a suburban development in the background.

I don't know if this is a historic structure or not, but I would love to have a tiny house like this one.

I don’t know if this is a historic structure or not, but I would love to have a tiny house like this one.

This house is for sale and looks like it's abandoned. It's located on two of the oldest roads in Centreville...Braddock and Mount Gilead.

This house is for sale and looks like it’s abandoned. It’s located on two of the oldest roads in Centreville…Braddock and Mount Gilead.

Another old house.

Another old house.

A structure at the Mount Gilead Historic site. Apparently, an inn opened up here in 1785.

A structure at the Mount Gilead Historic site. Apparently, an inn opened up here in 1785.

Detail of decaying structure at Mount Gilead.

Detail of decaying structure at Mount Gilead.

The Old Stone Church was originally built in 1854 but had to be rebuilt after the Civil War in 1872.

The Old Stone Church was originally built in 1854 but had to be rebuilt after the Civil War in 1872.

Cavalry Museum. I didn't know Centreville had a museum, but apparently this is a Civil War Museum.

Cavalry Museum. I didn’t know Centreville had a museum, but apparently this is a Civil War Museum.

HIDDEN SHED

Close up of shed.

Close up of shed.



Categories: Centreville, Suburban Finds, Suburbs, The Urban Anthropologist Files

Tags: , , ,

1 reply

Trackbacks

  1. The Mystery of the Old House in the Woods | A Nomad Life

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: