What’s More Patriotic than New York City on the Fourth of July?

My friends Courtney and Jefrey live in Hoboken and since I have a bit of time off before I start my new job, I decided to visit them for the weekend. I was in New York about three months ago and I figured the fourth of July weekend would be a good time to visit again. This past weekends I did two all-American things: I watched the fireworks in New York City (technically in New Jersey, but I was pretty close) and I went to a baseball game. I discovered that I am still terrified of fireworks, mostly because I’m scared of loud noises, but it was still a pretty amazing experience, watching a 25 minute fire works show on the Hudson River with the New York City skyline as a backdrop. Next time I’ll just wear earplugs and it will be perfect. Then, on Saturday, I went to my first baseball game (Orioles-Yankees…Yankees won…sorry Courtney). I’ve never been to a professional sporting event — I’m more of an introverted/creative type of girl — but I actually loved it. I loved the energy of it, the crowds, the food stands, the music, the commentary, the games, the big screen, and of course, actually watching the game. It felt so nostalgic and American in that happy, wholesome way. Kind of how I felt when I went to Bluemont Park. As a kid, we didn’t go to sporting events and I think I missed out on a lot of traditional “American-y” things. Probably because my parents are foreign. I can’t wait to go to a Nationals game. Could this possibly mean that I could actually enjoy a football game??? Seems so unlike me, but you never know. So here is a photo essay of my wonderful NYC weekend:

I stayed with some friends in Hoboken, a really nice, upscale town right across the Hudson from Manhattan. It's about a 15 minute PATH ride from the city and has some fantastic views of the New York City skyline. Lots of great bakeries, restaurants and bars, and plenty of young professionals and young families. It's kind of like Arlington...but with more character and much better views.

I stayed with some friends in Hoboken, a really nice, upscale town right across the Hudson from Manhattan. It’s about a 15 minute PATH ride from the city and has some fantastic views of the New York City skyline. Lots of great bakeries, restaurants and bars, and plenty of young professionals and young families. It’s kind of like Arlington…but with more character and much better views.

A virgin Mary in a Hoboken home.  My friend (and hostess) Courtney was telling me that Frank Sinatra is from Hoboken and the town was once home to a large Italian community, which is why you see a lot of religious icons.

A Virgin Mary in a Hoboken home. My friend (and hostess) Courtney was telling me that Frank Sinatra is from Hoboken and the town was once home to a large Italian community, which is why you see a lot of religious icons.

Our Fourth of July view. We went to the grocery store, picked up some dinner (sushi and seaweed salad for me), laid out a blanket and settled in for the fireworks.

Our Fourth of July view. We went to the grocery store, picked up some dinner (sushi and seaweed salad for me), laid out a blanket and settled in for the fireworks.

New York City skyline from Hoboken.

New York City skyline from Hoboken.

Yankee's Stadium and view of the Bronx.

Yankee’s Stadium and view of the Bronx.

Me at my first baseball game.

My hosts, Courtney and Jefrey.

My hosts, Courtney and Jefrey, the best hosts ever.

View of Manhattan from Staten Island.

View of Manhattan from Staten Island.

View of Manhattan from the Staten Island ferry. I was strongly advised against going to Staten Island. Words and phrases like “miserable,” “not worth it,” and “don’t waste your time,” were used, but I decided to go anyway. I met a friend at 33rd and 6th and we walked down to the ferry (extremely poor judgement in 95 degree,100 percent humidity weather, but good judgment has never been my forte). So yes, I concede, Staten Island didn’t exactly blow me away, but it wasn’t that bad. Plus, I really enjoyed the ferry — you get great views of Manhattan AND it’s free.
The closest I've been to the Statue of Liberty. It's a little blurry, but this is a view from the Staten Island Ferry.

The closest I’ve been to the Statue of Liberty. It’s a little blurry, but this is a view from the Staten Island Ferry.

On the last day of my trip, Jefrey, Courtney and I headed over to Noches de Colombia Restaurant in Union City, New Jersey, for an authentic Colombian breakfast. We enjoyed pan de bonos, empanadas, arepa de chocolo con queso, maracuya juice, hueves revueltos  and arepa con queso. So delicious! One of the nice things about living in New York is that you can always find something, someone or somewhere that reminds you of home.

On the last day of my trip, Jefrey, Courtney and I headed over to Noches de Colombia Restaurant in Union City, New Jersey, for an authentic Colombian breakfast. We enjoyed pan de bonos, empanadas, arepa de chocolo con queso, jugo de maracuya, hueves revueltos and arepa con queso. So delicious! One of the nice things about living in New York is that you can always find something, someone or somewhere that reminds you of home.

If ever you feel the need to be surrounded by pupusas, Union City hosts a Festival de la Pupusa every summer! Union City is a nearly 100% Latino community about 10 miles from Manhattan and is a good place to hang out when/if you ever feel nostalgic for Latin America.

If ever you feel the need to be surrounded by pupusas, Union City hosts a Festival de la Pupusa every summer! Union City is a nearly 100% Latino community about 10 miles from Manhattan and is a good place to hang out when/if you ever feel nostalgic for Latin America.

A view of the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges from lower Manhattan.

A view of the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges from lower Manhattan and the Brooklyn skyline as a backdrop. In a previous blog post I talked about how New York really is America’s ultimate city and any other city can only hope for second place — and I really believe this is true. New York has so many layers and feels alive. I’ve really only been to a few cities that actually felt alive — New York, Paris, Florence, Buenos Aires — and I think that feeling alive, pulsating and vibrant is what makes a city great. I like D.C, but I don’t know that it’s a city you can love in the way some people love New York and Paris. I guess you could say certain cities have soul while others just have character.

Industral angles, lines and metal. Another view of the Manhattan bridge, the Hudson River and the Brooklyn skyline.

industrial angles, lines and metal. Another view of the Manhattan Bridge, the Hudson River and the Brooklyn skyline.



Categories: American Cities, U.S Travels

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2 replies

Trackbacks

  1. “Son can you play me a memory? I’m not really sure how it goes, but it’s sad and it’s sweet…” | A Nomad Life
  2. A Bunch of Colombians Went to A Baseball Game | My (Former) Nomad Life

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